Before and After: This Wagon Wheel Project Could Have Gone Horribly Wrong


I was warming up to make a bunch of wagon wheel coffee table jokes — most referencing When Harry Met Sally — when I realized this is actually a mill wheel. We’ll just have to appreciate this project for what it is: an approachable, unique upcycle of a neglected old piece of equipment.

Here’s how this project came to be, according to Roxanne of The Honeycomb Home:

While at a flea market, an old wooden wheel caught my eye. The seller said it may have been from a grist mill. It was too cool to leave behind, so I bought it.

I love a mystery! If anyone out there knows exactly what this wheel might have been used for, please let us know. Let’s see what Roxanne did with the wheel…

It looks so cool! The exterior of the wheel is so unexpected and cool, and the simple black legs let the intricate yet rustic appeal of the wheel shine. This is an ideal upcycling project: the unique character of the object in question is showcased, but it still fits perfectly into nearly any modern decor. Interesting to think this project could have gone very differently:

My husband and I wanted to repurpose this into decor. Our original idea was to make it a chandelier, but it’s a heavy piece so we opted for a side table instead.

I would have loved to see this wheel as a chandelier, but it’s easier to appreciate its character up-close as a side table.

The glass top was a stroke of genius—it makes the wheel functional as a table, protects it, and allows the interior to be admired. Here’s how it was done:

This was fairly simple. I added hairpin legs to the bottom. For the top, I had a piece of glass cut at a local shop. It nestles right into the top of the wheel. I love this because it’s unique!

I always forget that glass shops exists, and that one can just waltz in and get some glass cut! Let this project be a reminder to all of us that we might have more options than we think when it comes to DIY projects.

Here you can see that the wheel had a bit of a lip, allowing the glass to rest gently without any need for an adhesive. Fortuitous!

Thank you, Roxanne! Readers, visit The Honeycomb Home.

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